Dietary fiber Who will help and who will be harmed

Nov 4, 2019 House

Dietary fiber Who will help and who will be harmed

It absorbs water, prevents atherosclerosis, absorbs heavy metals and harmful metabolites, cares for the level of glucose in the blood, positively affects the development of proper microflora in the intestines, supports the process of weight loss – these are just a few of the many advantages of dietary fiber.
Fibre is an important element of a well-balanced and healthy diet. Experts at almost every step emphasize that consuming the right amount of dietary fiber gives many benefits for our health. However, it is worth remembering that everything has its advantages and disadvantages, that is why not everyone’s excess of this valuable product in the diet will serve.
Dietary fiber? What exactly is it?
Fibre is a dietary fibre that consists of vegetable polysaccharides (e.g. cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, rubber) and lignin. They are resistant to our digestive enzymes, but are an excellent medium for the intestinal microflora and thus regulate the functioning of the digestive tract. The composition of dietary fiber differs depending on the plant species.
A very important component of fibre is resistant starch, which is not found in nature and is produced after the heat treatment of products such as potatoes or white rice. It is a great nutrient for bacteria in the intestines, so they are stimulated to produce butyric acid, which regenerates the intestinal villi and rebuilds the mucous membrane of the digestive tract.
– Thanks to this, the consumption of resistant starch may reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer – emphasizes Łukasz Sot from, the first in the USA Internet diet catering comparison engine.
There are two types of fiber: soluble and insoluble in water. The first one: regulates the functioning of the digestive system, increases the density of digestive content, has the ability to capture toxins from food, so that they are excreted and not absorbed into the bloodstream, provides a nutrient for the intestinal myctoplasm, affects its composition, binds excess bile acids, supports the regeneration of the mucous membrane of the digestive tract.
In turn, insoluble fiber mechanically irritates the walls of the large intestine, which stimulates its peristalsis and gives the feeling of satiety.
How much fiber does your body need?
Fiber consumption in the USA is about 20 grams per day. This is definitely not enough. The WHO (World Health Organization) defines the daily dietary fibre intake for adults at 25-40 grams. What is the reason for this wide range in weight? This is due to the difference in body weight between men and women.
It is best to oscillate around these upper limits on a daily basis. According to specialists, it is worth thinking about increasing the proportion of dietary fiber (especially water-soluble fiber) in the daily diet.
Where can we find fiber?
– It is worth remembering that the amount of fiber should be increased gradually in order to get the body used to it. Otherwise, bloating, diarrhoea and abdominal pain may occur – advises the specialist from and adds that it is also important to provide adequate hydration, because only then does the fiber swell and fulfill its functions.
This is why constipation can occur when eating high-fibre foods without providing enough liquid. To avoid this, you should drink at least 1.5 l of water a day.
The highest amount of soluble fiber is contained in the following products: cupcake husks, Psylmerry cake, lentils, white beans, peas, dried figs and apricots, currants (black and red). It is also found in popular fruits: apples, grapefruits, raspberries and gooseberries. Whereas insoluble fibre contains wheat bran, linseed, coconut chips, oat bran, almonds, brown rice, buckwheat and lamb groats, sunflower seeds.
Who should be careful with fibre?
The advantages of fibre are indisputable, but in some people it is even forbidden. People suffering from inflammation of the digestive tract (stomach, intestines, pancreas and bile ducts) as well as people with gastric and duodenal ulcers should be especially careful.
– In all these diseases, insoluble fiber will be particularly harmful, which irritates the walls of the gastrointestinal tract and may cause additional damage, as well as hinder the healing of already formed diverticula, wounds, ulcers. Moreover, dietary fiber consumed in excess may hinder the absorption of vitamins and minerals (including iron, calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc) and lead to anaemia – says Łukasz Sot.
As usual in dietetics, in the case of dietary fiber, there is no universal recommendation for everyone. Dietary fiber is a valuable nutrient, but you need to know how to use it. Therefore, it is worth observing the reactions of our body and reacting to possible signals to adjust its type and amount in our diet.