Internet users and smartphone users during their holidays are particularly vulnerable to cybercriminals and thieves

Mar 21, 2019 Finance

Internet users and smartphone users during their holidays are particularly vulnerable to cybercriminals and thieves

The borrowers themselves are often exposed to the risk of stolen valuables or cyber-burglary. Both incidents may be equally severe, so experts advise increased vigilance. They warn against using unsecured wi-fi networks where cybercriminals can steal banking and social media passwords and other sensitive data. Losing your smartphone also exposes you to such risks. Experts also advise you not to spread the word about your trip in social media. It’s like an invitation to thieves.
Next to your wallet, your smartphone is one of the most commonly carried items in your pocket, and it’s a great opportunity for thieves. It is important to remember that this device is no longer used only for making phone calls or SMS communications. We store a lot of data about ourselves.
– Today, a smartphone provides us with access to virtually every resource, social networks, cloud computing resources and, above all, electronic mail, very often also to business e-mail. Therefore, we should make this device particularly secure,”, data protection expert at ODO 24.
As he stresses, a four-character PIN may prove to be too weak protection. It is better to secure access with a password of a considerable complexity or to use biometric technology. When you notice a stolen or lost smartphone, you should react immediately.
– It is worth using a service that is available from virtually every smartphone software provider – remote management of a device so that it can be remotely blocked, its content removed, or possibly determined by geolocation, where it is located. These elements determine how much we will protect our privacy during the summer holidays.
In order to limit the risk of hacking into the device, all communication channels, such as Bluetooth, wi-fi or mobile data, should be switched on only when necessary.
– You only need to use a free wi-fi that is password-protected. Otherwise, there is a significant risk that another person using the same Internet access will simply intercept the data we send. This includes, for example, data authorising electronic banking or access to social networking sites.
We should also avoid giving out personal data when logging into public networks.
– In such a situation, we should verify who asks for it and whether all obligations arising from the Personal Data Protection Act are fulfilled, i.e. whether the entity informs, who it is, for what purpose it will process personal data and whether it gives contact to itself, full address, name and registered office. The exceptions are situations when the general interest is at stake. At airports, access to wi-fi is particularly protected, so the network can ask for the name or flight number of the flight.
We also expose ourselves to thieves’ attacks when we publish information about the beginning of holidays in social media. This is a clear signal to criminals that the apartment will be empty for a few days. Determining the address is not difficult either.
– Thieves will gladly take advantage of it and it may turn out on their return that our apartment was plundered because someone knew that it was empty and nobody took care of it.
There is another risk connected with publications in social media. This time it’s legal. It is connected with publishing the image of people without their consent.
– Image is our personal good. Image issues are not only regulated by the Civil Code, but also by the Copyright and Related Rights Act. As a rule, we should always have permission to publish someone else’s image. Of course, the Act introduces certain exceptions, especially when it is a public person and this image is preserved in connection with the performance of a public function. The same is true if the person in the photo is only an element of the photo when photographing a landscape, gathering or public event.
The expert advises, if possible, to ask for permission to publish the photo. This also applies to friends.